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Lambchop

Lambchop - 'This (is what I wanted to tell you)' (Album Review)

Photo: Jo Bongard Kurt Wagner’s gang of alt-country stalwarts, Lambchop, are back for a 14th studio album—they skipped number 13 due to superstition. As with 2016’s ‘Flotus’, the Nashville band use electronic arrangements to accompany Wagner’s distinctive deadpan drawl, and broadly, it works well.

Written by: Jacob Brookman | Date: Tuesday, 26 March 2019

Strand of Oaks

Strand of Oaks - Eraserland (Album Review)

Strand of Oaks’ sixth album, ‘Eraserland’, could in another world easily be termed My Morning Jacket’s eighth. Each member of the veteran Kentucky indie-rock band, bar frontman Jim James, has suited up to back Tim Showalter here, and it’s a timely proposition if ever there was one.

Written by: Graeme Marsh | Date: Monday, 25 March 2019

American Football

American Football - American Football (Album Review)

After releasing their self-titled debut album in 1999, and promptly splitting up, American Football became a cultural touchstone. They were synonymous with the intelligent side of emo, having created a template that would be imitated throughout the new millennium: complex, intertwining guitar parts, unconventional rhythms, and melodramatic lyrics that chronicled heartbreak and uncertainty with a sort of smug collegiate literariness.

Written by: Ben Gladman | Date: Friday, 22 March 2019

Weezer

Weezer - Weezer (The Black Album) (Album Review)

Photo: Shawn Murphy Discussions of Weezer’s recent work have tended towards the philosophical, and perhaps also the overly kind. Are we being trolled? Is this a sort of exercise in performance art? Or, in reality, are we simply seeing a once beloved rock band flounder as they head towards the twilight of their career? ‘The Black Album’, their 13th LP, almost aggressively plays into this dynamic with a slate of songs that alternately feel tossed off and self-involved.

Written by: Huw Baines | Date: Wednesday, 20 March 2019

Gesaffelstein

Gesaffelstein - Hyperion (Album Review)

When Kanye West recruited Gesaffelstein to produce on his iconic ‘Yeezus’ LP a little over five years ago, we watched as a powerful new energy was awoken in the French producer. Soon after, he translated that into the menacing power of his debut, ‘Aleph’.

Written by: Milly McMahon | Date: Monday, 18 March 2019

Stella Donnelly

Stella Donnelly - Beware of the Dogs (Album Review)

Photo: Pooneh Ghana Stella Donnelly’s bite is far worse than her bark. On her debut album, ‘Beware of the Dogs’ some scathing remarks—mostly focusing on inequality, sexual misconduct and toxic masculinity—are tied up neatly in sickly sweet melodies.

Written by: Helen Payne | Date: Friday, 15 March 2019

Foals

Foals - Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost - Part 1 (Album Review)

Some 11 years on from the release of their debut, there’s still a crackling sense of excitement around a new Foals album. This year, that buzz will be doubled. ‘Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost - Part 1’ is the first of two collections the band are set to release in 2019 (numbers five and six in their discography) after an abundance of ideas were developed during a year in the studio.

Written by: Graeme Marsh | Date: Thursday, 14 March 2019

Sigrid

Sigrid - Sucker Punch (Album Review)

Now that the initial frenzy around Sigrid's terrific, groundbreaking singles—Strangers and Don’t Kill My Vibe—has died down, we have her debut full-length album, ‘Sucker Punch’, to consider.

Written by: Jacob Brookman | Date: Wednesday, 13 March 2019

Solange

Solange - When I Get Home (Album Review)

Photo: Max Hirschberger Reminiscing on her formative years, discovering self, music and style, Solange Knowles has crafted ‘When I Get Home’, a love letter to her hometown, Houston. Mood-boarding intimate influences and inspirations, in both sound and cinema, this 19 track compendium arrived spanning both mediums alongside a stunning short film.

Written by: Milly McMahon | Date: Tuesday, 12 March 2019

Dido

Dido - Still on My Mind (Album Review)

For Brits of a certain age, Dido’s music represents a particular sense of time and space. The late ‘90s was a period of intense, outward-looking optimism and, though the brilliance of Britpop was fading, even easy-listening pop acts like Dido seemed to have a high degree of creative integrity.

Written by: Jacob Brookman | Date: Monday, 11 March 2019

Pond

Pond - Tasmania (Album Review)

Photo: Pooneh Ghana With their eighth release, Australian psych-rock collective Pond attempt to finally rid themselves of the stylistic associations with former member, and Tame Impala leader, Kevin Parker that have coloured their previous efforts.

Written by: Grant Jones | Date: Friday, 08 March 2019

Little Simz

Little Simz - GREY Area (Album Review)

On ‘GREY Area’, Little Simz delivers a powerful representation of her talents across a brilliant, fluid set of hip hop tracks. Where misogynistic rhymes and crass brags often replace intelligent wordplay and eloquence in the work of her male counterparts, she steps up, articulate and powerful.

Written by: Milly McMahon | Date: Thursday, 07 March 2019

WOAHNOWS

Woahnows - Young and Cool (Album Review)

‘Young and Cool’, the new LP by indie-punks Woahnows, has a title that suggests a knowing smirk. But its contents tell a different story. Far from being a glib, tossed-off exercise in self-deprecation, this is a heartfelt, devilishly addictive piece of work that pushes for inclusivity and kindness.

Written by: Huw Baines | Date: Wednesday, 06 March 2019

Fews

FEWS - Into Red (Album Review)

When multinational psych outfit FEWS released their debut,‘Means’, in 2016, it was evident where the band’s inspirations lay. Just about everything—including the kitchen sink—was thrown into its motorik, krautrock beats, probing their core sound as though they were squeezing every last drop of juice from an orange.

Written by: Graeme Marsh | Date: Tuesday, 05 March 2019

Lil Pump

Lil Pump - Harverd Dropout (Album Review)

Gucci Gang rapper Lil Pump’s sophomore album 'Harverd Dropout' is hard to tolerate. Its 40 painstaking minutes find the Florida native going all out in his attempts to offend anyone and everyone from the jump.

Written by: Milly McMahon | Date: Wednesday, 27 February 2019

Piroshka

Piroshka - Brickbat (Album Review)

Photo: Neil Stewart Supergroups are often given a bad name—they feel like a chance for fading artists to group together and illuminate their individual talents one last time. Perhaps, cynically, they even help with a bit of PR for the original bands that each member once excelled in.

Written by: Grant Jones | Date: Tuesday, 26 February 2019

Ladytron

Ladytron - Ladytron (Album Review)

You could be excused for thinking that an eight year hiatus probably spells out ‘split’. But, somewhat unexpectedly, Liverpool’s synth-pop maestros Ladytron have returned with their sixth album following a successful Pledge campaign.

Written by: Graeme Marsh | Date: Tuesday, 19 February 2019

YAK

Yak - Pursuit of Momentary Happiness (Album Review)

There is a large side order of expectation served up alongside London-based trio Yak’s second LP, ‘Pursuit of Momentary Happiness’, thanks to some friends in high places. Released on Jack White’s Third Man Records, and arriving after an endorsement from Tame Impala, the record also features a cameo from Spiritualized’s Jason Pierce for good measure.

Written by: Grant Jones | Date: Monday, 18 February 2019

Spielbergs

Spielbergs - This is Not the End (Album Review)

To listen to Spielbergs’ debut album, ‘This is Not the End’, is to picture a room of people in black jeans and denim jackets, with the flash of a white sports sock above a tattered pair of Vans classics. It’s to picture sweat, euphoria, a giddy release of hoarse voices and spilled beer. If you are in your 30s, and coming to terms with the fact, it knows you. It feels the same way.

Written by: Huw Baines | Date: Friday, 15 February 2019

Girlpool

Girlpool - What Chaos Is Imaginary (Album Review)

Photo: Gina Canavan On their third album, ‘What Chaos is Imaginary’, L.A. duo Girlpool attempt to expand out of the sometimes kitsch folk-rock milieu of their previous releases. By truly exposing themselves honestly, they manage to do so with confidence and no little style.

Written by: Grant Jones | Date: Thursday, 14 February 2019

 
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