Dizzee Rascal

Dizzee Rascal - Raskit (Album Review)

Sometime in the last century, Louis Armstrong was asked by a journalist whether he felt threatened by newcomers aping his musical style. The jazz pioneer responded: “A lotta cats copy the Mona Lisa, but people still line up to see the original.”

Written by: Jacob Brookman | Date: Monday, 24 July 2017

Waxahatchee

Waxahatchee - Out In The Storm (Album Review)

Neil Sedaka was right. Breaking up is hard to do. And then there’s the question of what happens next. There are the basics of deciding what to do and where to go, but also the reality that these tasks must be navigated while carrying a jarring, raw set of emotions on your back.

Written by: Huw Baines | Date: Tuesday, 18 July 2017

Broken Social Scene

Broken Social Scene - Hug of Thunder (Album Review)

On ‘Hug of Thunder’, Broken Social Scene provide a soundtrack for the modern times of Generation X. The record finds the collective back together after a gap of seven years and turning to their musical community to provide solace at a time of great anxiety.

Written by: Jennifer Geddes | Date: Monday, 17 July 2017

Sheer Mag

Sheer Mag - Need To Feel Your Love (Album Review)

Photo: Marie Lin Sheer Mag keep their cards close to their chest; we only ever see as much of their hand as they want us to. The band formed only three years ago in Philadelphia and have since amassed a following the old way, with basement shows, a slew of 7”s and a fistful of riffs that fuse Thin Lizzy with righteous power-pop in place of a social media presence and network of industry people.

Written by: Laura Johnson | Date: Friday, 14 July 2017

The Telescopes

The Telescopes - As Light Return (Album Review)

Photo: Carlo Emme Since their 1987 formation, Stephen Lawrie’s Telescopes have released a slate of albums that sit at varying levels of listenability. Initially battling against record magnates’ demands for hits, Lawrie has gradually filtered out third party expectations and honed in on his core instincts to produce creations based on uncompromised beliefs.

Written by: Graeme Marsh | Date: Thursday, 13 July 2017

TLC

TLC - TLC (Album Review)

TLC owned a definitive moment in modern R&B’s golden era. T-Boz, Chilli, and the late Lisa ‘Left Eye’ Lopes inspired female empowerment and, with songs like Waterfalls and No Scrubs, secured a place in pop history. ‘TLC’, a final album fronted by T-Boz and Chilli, ensures that their legacy is left intact.

Written by: Milly McMahon | Date: Wednesday, 12 July 2017

Public Service Broadcasting

Public Service Broadcasting - Every Valley (Album Review)

Photo: Dan Kendall Public Service Broadcasting are a rare breed of band. An instrumental group whose work utilises a wide range of subject matter lifted from archived interviews, speeches and (in the case of their live shows) footage of turning points in modern world history, they have cornered a level of commercial appeal usually divorced from such a niche style.

Written by: Ben Gallivan | Date: Tuesday, 11 July 2017

Jay Z

Jay-Z - 4:44 (Album Review)

Jay-Z represents an era of rap that has all but run its course. More so than anybody else, the self-made superstar and business mogul has embodied hip-hop’s most wealth-obsessed era. He rang in the millennium by splashing millions on the music video for his single Big Pimpin’ and began the next decade by rhetorically asking “what’s 50 grand to a motherfucker like me?” on the single Niggas in Paris.

Written by: Jonathan Rimmer | Date: Tuesday, 11 July 2017

Great Grandpa

Great Grandpa - Plastic Cough (Album Review)

Photo: Buggo Vigor There’s a song on Great Grandpa’s ‘Plastic Cough’ called Fade. It’s about being confronted with the same stuff time and time again and yearning for a jolt of excitement. It’s also a neat summation of what this record does so well; namely remind us that gritty, power chord-happy indie-rock can still be vital and thrilling.

Written by: Huw Baines | Date: Monday, 10 July 2017

Haim

Haim - Something To Tell You (Album Review)

What a treat. Let’s start with the vocals on Haim’s long-awaited second LP, ‘Something to Tell You’, shall we? One reason that sibling pop groups appeal is that the timbre of their voices often match, so when singing together there is an unusually cohesive blend.

Written by: Jacob Brookman | Date: Monday, 10 July 2017

Washed Out

Washed Out - Mister Mellow (Album Review)

Photo: Alexandra Gavillet It turns out that chillwave is alive and well. At least it is in the mind of Ernest Greene, the man behind Washed Out. Now touting his third LP, ‘Mister Mellow’, it’s clear little has changed since he took up the mantle with the 2009 EP ‘Life of Leisure’.

Written by: Ben Gallivan | Date: Friday, 07 July 2017

Public Enemy

Public Enemy - Nothing is Quick in the Desert (Album Review)

Like many of the best pop groups, Public Enemy have a complex musical identity.

Written by: Jacob Brookman | Date: Thursday, 06 July 2017

Katy Perry

Katy Perry - Witness (Album Review)

Katy Perry is a woman of conviction and wild creativity. Uncompromising in her vision, a spirit of reinvention and rebellion resonate proudly from ‘Witness’, her fifth studio album. It feels like a musical turning point, but while her well documented love life and cat fights foment intrigue from track one there are plenty of stumbling blocks in her path.

Written by: Milly McMahon | Date: Wednesday, 05 July 2017

Calvin Harris

Calvin Harris - Funk Wav Bounces Vol. 1 (Album Review)

Since Calvin Harris swaggered onto the scene with 2007’s ‘I Created Disco’, his eye-watering rise has managed to combine occasionally thrilling EDM hits with a seemingly endless supply of A-list pop stars willing to collaborate. Despite this success, he remains fairly uncelebrated in wider music criticism. ‘Funk Wav Bounces Vol. 1’ demonstrates why.

Written by: Jacob Brookman | Date: Tuesday, 04 July 2017

Benjamin Booker

Benjamin Booker - Witness (Album Review)

Photo: Thomas Baltes On ‘Witness’, Benjamin Booker uses the sounds of ‘60s soul to explore his place as a young black man in modern America.

Written by: Jennifer Geddes | Date: Tuesday, 04 July 2017

Baio

Baio - Man of the World (Album Review)

With Vampire Weekend on a break since the departure of Rostam Batmanglij last year, the band’s bassist, Chris Baio, has been beavering away on a second solo album. ‘Man of the World’ comes inspired (if that is the right word) by the election of Donald Trump and is a marvellous art-rock melange, pairing pristine pop with more experimental sonic happenings.

Written by: Jacob Brookman | Date: Monday, 03 July 2017

Algiers

Algiers - The Underside of Power (Album Review)

In a recent interview, Algiers bassist and Atlanta native Ryan Mahan described the American south as “one of the epicentres of the construction of the modern world; modern economies built on slavery, exploitation, everything like that, and also built on this very confused hypocrisy that actually we’re all nice, genteel southern people - we’re all part of civilised society and at the same time we’re horrifically structurally violent.”

Written by: Jacob Brookman | Date: Thursday, 29 June 2017

Lorde

Lorde - Melodrama (Album Review)

One of the first things we do when we run into an old friend is take inventory of what’s changed. When Lorde stepped back into the room at the start of March with Green Light’s piano line in tow, it became clear that it would be the differences in her music, not what had stayed the same, that might sweep us from our feet the second time around.

Written by: Huw Baines | Date: Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Chuck Berry

Chuck Berry - Chuck (Album Review)

These days, the term legend is flung around as casually as insults are across the barbaric playgrounds of social media. Ed Sheeran a legend? Gary Barlow? Justin Bieber? Let’s get real. The term should be exclusively reserved for game-changing artists, pioneers and visionaries who reshape the cultural landscape and leave behind a legacy that echoes through the ages.

Written by: Simon Ramsay | Date: Wednesday, 28 June 2017

SZA

SZA - Ctrl (Album Review)

On ‘Ctrl’, SZA explores the personal struggles of a young black American woman and derives strength from total honesty.

Written by: Jennifer Geddes | Date: Wednesday, 28 June 2017

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>
Results 181 - 200 of 2355