Home > News & Reviews > Field Music

Field Music - Open Here (Album Review)

Friday, 09 February 2018 Written by Helen Payne

That the Brewis brothers are now fathers to young children is evident on ‘Open Here’, and parenthood has given Field Music a brand new way of experiencing the world, its politics and its stereotypes.

‘Open Here’ is predominantly fun, frolicking through each track like a four-year-old desperate to get out and play. The album’s warm, welcoming opener, Time in Joy, sounds like everything an ornate art-pop band should be: the soundtrack to a Mario Brothers platform game and an outtake from a Fascination-era Human League session. 

But this joviality is contrasted - and only just complemented - by the album’s lyrical analysis of a society in turmoil. Checking On a Message, for example, explores the dread accompanying any number of political votes gone awry in recent times.

Despite sounding like it could have been taken from Steely Dan’s back catalogue, its one-two combination of blues guitar riffs and a brass section paves the way for melodic vocals that wait up all night to hear the result of the Brexit referendum, “hoping it isn’t true”.

The brothers tie up their anxiety at recent political turbulence by exploring how to raise a child in a world like this. The answer? Be who you want, little ones. No King No Princess defies gender stereotypes by directly addressing the children: “You can dress up how you want  And you can do the job you want  And you can do it.”

It is important, too, not to forget structural privilege. Count It Up inspects modern day entitlement and instructs us to count our blessings and use them to change things. Brewis cries: “If your body makes some kind of sense to you count it up / Then use the breath you have left to say something that matters.” There’s incongruity, though, between the ‘80s synth patterns and 2018 problems, accentuating further the difficulties in raising kids in a totally different place to the one in which you grew up.

By interspersing cheerful, recreational numbers like Gone To The Country and the strutting-its-stuff Share a Pillow with calmer moments such as Front of House and the title track, the band manages to marry the contrasting styles of frivolity and heaviness. It’s not always plain sailing, whether that’s at bath time, bed time, or referendum time. Another in a long list of albums reacting to political upset, ‘Open Here’ does so with a fresh lens, highlighting the worries of raising children in the here and now while wrapping them up neatly in a bright, shiny post-pop ribbon.

Field Music Upcoming Tour Dates are as follows:

Thu March 08 2018 - BRIGHTON Komedia
Fri March 09 2018 - BRISTOL Lantern
Sat March 10 2018 - SOUTHAMPTON Engine Rooms
Sun March 11 2018 - EXETER Exeter Phoenix
Thu March 15 2018 - BIRMINGHAM O2 Institute2 Birmingham
Fri March 16 2018 - MANCHESTER Gorilla
Sat March 17 2018 - GLASGOW Saint Luke's
Thu March 22 2018 - LIVERPOOL Arts Club
Fri March 23 2018 - SHEFFIELD Foundry, Sheffield
Sat March 24 2018 - NORWICH Waterfront Norwich
Sun March 25 2018 - LONDON Barbican Centre

Click here to compare & buy Field Music Tickets at Stereoboard.com.





Let Us Know What You Think - Leave A Comment!




You May Also Like:

Hop Along - Bark Your Head Off, Dog (Album Review)
Thu 12 Apr 2018
Photo: Tonje Thilesen When confronted with an empty canvas, there’s always a temptation to fill every inch of it; to purge yourself of ideas, to remake and remodel. On their second album, ‘Painted Shut’, Hop Along didn’t have that option. Their time in the studio came with a full stop attached to it, so they had to work fast and clean. The dense, layered approach of their debut, ‘Get Disowned’, was set aside in favour of economical indie-rock songs that had the happy byproduct of pushing their melodies, and Frances Quinlan’s remarkable voice, to the fore more than ever before.
The Shires - Accidentally On Purpose (Album Review)
Thu 26 Apr 2018
It’ll rather be amusing if anyone accuses the Shires of selling out to the world of American pop-country on their third album. The British duo were clearly edging further in that direction on 2016’s ‘My Universe’ anyway, so it only took a small step for Ben Earle and Crissie Rhodes to fully embrace that style and deliver ‘Accidentally on Purpose’, a fine album that’s tailor-made to crack the US market.
Speedy Ortiz - Twerp Verse (Album Review)
Thu 03 May 2018
Photo: Shervin Lainez ‘Foil Deer’, Speedy Ortiz’s 2015 album, cemented their place as a band who are always worth listening to. Sadie Dupuis constantly has her head on swivel, picking anecdotes that on closer inspection veer away from the autobiographical and into the universal.
Unknown Mortal Orchestra - Sex & Food (Album Review)
Wed 18 Apr 2018
Photo: Neil Krug A simple glance at the tracklisting would lead you to think that ‘Sex & Food’, the fourth album by Unknown Mortal Orchestra, is intently focused on the political context in which it was born. Ours is a world of technological turmoil and political pandemonium, and more than half of the song titles here scream of a critical appraisal of our current climate.
Manic Street Preachers - Resistance is Futile (Album Review)
Wed 25 Apr 2018
After dragging themselves out of the doldrums with 2007’s ‘Send Away The Tigers’, Manic Street Preachers released a string of superb records that were often brave, creatively single-minded and indicative of a band still bursting with ideas. But what goes up must come down. Their new LP, ‘Resistance is Futile,’ may offer a return to their anthemic mid-’90s sound, but it’s a hit and miss affair that sees a winning run finally come to an end.
Blossoms - Cool Like You (Album Review)
Thu 10 May 2018
Did you hear the one about the band who recorded two versions of their second album, and then released the wrong one?
Peace - Kindness is The New Rock and Roll (Album Review)
Tue 15 May 2018
When Peace burst onto the indie-rock scene five years ago, amid a maelstrom of tie-dye t-shirts and reverb-smothered, well, everything, it was clear they wanted to sound big. The Worcester four-piece set the foundations with their debut LP, ‘In Love,’ and built further with its grander follow-up, ‘Happy People’. But, as ‘Kindness is The New Rock and Roll’ shows, bigger doesn’t always mean better.
Okkervil River - In the Rainbow Rain (Album Review)
Mon 30 Apr 2018
Okkervil River’s Will Sheff has long been known for his bleak outlook on life. The places his songs frequented seemed dark and dangerous, while rock music was going to be the death of him. That came to a climax with 2016’s ‘Away’.
 
< Prev   Next >