Home > News & Reviews > Pinegrove

Pinegrove's Evan Stephens Hall Issues Apology After Allegations Of Sexual Coercion, Cancels US Tour

Tuesday, 21 November 2017 Written by Huw Baines

Pinegrove’s Evan Stephens Hall has issued an apology after being accused of sexual coercion, cancelling the band’s upcoming US tour in the process.

The indie-rock band had been due to head out later this month, beginning in Cleveland. “i recognize that this is the beginning of a long process of reflection,” he wrote, adding: "we'll be taking some time off in general. i started therapy on wednesday november 15th and plan to continue indefinitely." Read the statement below.

i am about to talk about something serious and i want to begin by saying that my actions have caused someone i care about deep emotional pain and i am so sorry.

i have been accused of sexual coercion. the accusation comes from someone i was involved with for a short but intense period of time. i won’t say more about this person because i want to respect her privacy and i ask anyone reading this to do the same.

the time we spent together was complicated. i believed we were mutually in love and we said it to each other often. but she also sometimes expressed reservation—she was dating someone else, and the dissolution of that relationship would have yielded intense personal and professional consequences. we talked about it thoroughly, endlessly. it was convoluted, heavy, emotional. this whole period felt like an impossible situation with no right answer, but we were working through it together.

eventually she broke up with her boyfriend. we got together again shortly after that, which lasted for about two weeks, during which we spent as much time together as possible. she met my parents. we discussed eventually moving in together. while it was by no means a simple relationship, it was sustained tenderly and i believed sincerely that it was mutual. i absolutely never threatened her, i never leveraged anything against her. i believed all of our decisions to be based in love.

still, i am coming to terms with the fact that i monumentally misread the situation. i am trying earnestly to follow this line as deeply as it goes to reflect on all of the things i could have done, and can do, better.

i should have more actively acknowledged my position of power as a public figure, and also as a man. i have always tried to approach all of my relationships under the premise of equality, but i see now more clearly that the inherent privilege of my gender and the accumulated privilege of being a recognized performer most certainly impacted this interaction.

and in reflecting on interactions with other people i've met through music, i see i could have been better there too. i have been flirtatious with fans and on a few occasions been intimate with people that i've met on tour. i've reached the conclusion now that that's not ever appropriate—even if they initiate it. there will always be an unfair power dynamic at play in these situations and it’s not ok for me to ignore that.

i am also led to something that i said regarding all this that i regret immensely. i said that i could sense who from the crowd would be interested in sleeping with me based on how they watched me perform. this comment applies such a dark layer to my interactions with people after our sets. nobody coming to a concert deserves to be evaluated based on their sexual potential by the performer. i absolutely crossed a line with that comment and that behavior, and i am so sorry.

i'm led further to consider my demeanor in most relationships i've been in. i can be very talkative and excitable, talking about wild plans, dreams, wanting to share everything. and i'm realizing that part of that confidence stems from my privilege as a man. i also realize that sort of approach doesn't leave room, or leave time, for my partner to reflect and come confidently to her feelings; that my enthusiasm doesn't leave space for any ambiguity on her end; it doesn't leave enough room for a meditative personal process. i believe that happened here too and i feel ashamed that my enthusiasm prevented me from listening as patiently as i should have.

i recognize that this is the beginning of a long process of reflection. in an effort to take time to make positive changes in my life and out of respect for what she is going through, we are cancelling our upcoming US tour. we'll be taking some time off in general. i started therapy on wednesday november 15th and plan to continue indefinitely. i am sincerely committed to improving my mental health and the way i treat everyone i interact with.

i am being held to account by the people close to me but the point of this post is not about me — it is an apology to the person i hurt and to the people i disappointed: my bandmates, my friends, my family, our fans. i’m so sorry. i have never felt remorse like this before. i will think about how i could have been better in this situation for as long as i live.





Let Us Know What You Think - Leave A Comment!




You May Also Like:

Hip-hop, Not Easy Listening: Lewis Parker On 20 Years of 'Masquerades & Silhouettes'
Thu 07 Jun 2018
For people of a certain generation, English producer Lewis Parker is best known for working with Ghostface Killah and being sampled by Joey Bada$$. Flitting between London and New York, Parker has made his name as one of hip-hop's most respected underground heads, renowned for his impeccable groove-based beats.
Enjoy the Balance: Collective Soul's Will Turpin Shines on 'Serengeti Drivers'
Tue 05 Jun 2018
Every now and then an album arrives from out of nowhere and instantly brightens up your day. Like rays of sunshine breaking through the clouds, ‘Serengeti Drivers’ – the debut solo album from Collective Soul bassist Will Turpin – is quite simply an unexpected treat. Bursting to the brim with a melodious mix of pop, rock, Americana, funk, soul and AOR, it’s the kind of record summer was invented for.
Timing Is Everything: Davey Newington Talks Boy Azooga's Debut LP '1,2 Kung Fu!'
Wed 06 Jun 2018
Photo: Stella Gelardi Malfilatre More haste, less speed. It’s a lesson a lot of us learn the hard way, and one that has shaped Davey Newington’s trajectory with his latest musical project, Boy Azooga.
'It's About Departure; Burning Bridges And Not Regretting It': Zeal & Ardor On 'Stranger Fruit'
Wed 13 Jun 2018
Photo: Manuel Gagneux A crow caws. There’s the sound of crunching and snapping. “I’m in a graaaaveyard,” says Manuel Gagneux. But he isn't really in a graveyard.
John Carpenter Announces Autumn UK Shows
Mon 16 Jul 2018
John Carpenter will bring his Anthology tour to London, Newcastle, Glasgow and Manchester this October.
On Writing: Ellis Jones Takes Trust Fund Into Reflective Waters With 'Bringing The Backline'
Tue 26 Jun 2018
History tells us that writers love to write about writers, and writing, and cafés, and corner tables in dive bars, and coffee and whiskey, and notebooks and typewriters, and muses and boyfriends and girlfriends and crushes.
Not For The Faint Of Heart: Myles Kennedy Takes Us Inside 'Year Of The Tiger'
Fri 29 Jun 2018
We’re all probably guilty of taking our favourite songwriters for granted; expecting them to pour their trauma into art we often consume purely for the purpose of entertainment. But do we ever truly consider what they must have been through to produce such deeply personal music? And would we be comfortable releasing the contents of our lives for the whole world to hear and critique?
Kamasi Washington - Heaven and Earth (Album Review)
Tue 26 Jun 2018
On Kamasi Washington’s second solo record, ‘Heavenand Earth’, the L.A. bandleader has called up an impressive team of players including Tony Austin, Ronald Bruner, Jr., Brandon Coleman, Cameron Graves, Terrance Martin, Miles Mosley and Thundercat. The result is a distinguished double-album of rich intensity that channels galactic fusion, sounds from ‘70s blaxploitation and sprawling jazz spirituals.
 
< Prev   Next >