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Django Django - Marble Skies (Album Review)

Monday, 29 January 2018 Written by Liam Turner

Django Django are an odd band. Even within the amorphous boundaries of art-rock it’s still quite difficult to put a finger on what exactly they are. It’s even more difficult to imagine when precisely the right time is to listen to their music. In a field in the middle of summer, perhaps? Flatcaps donned, glowsticks grasped?

On ‘Marble Skies’, the London-based four-piece actively embrace their quirkiness, making their intentions known right from the off with the title track. Charged with ELO-esque vocoders and a rapid-fire keyboard lead, it evokes decades-old images of Berlin superclubs. In this instance, that’s a good thing. Real Gone is another weird one, and its panoply of otherworldly effects calls to mind a post-apocalyptic Stanley Kubrick flick.

This ability, to borrow from all decades and any genre to produce something interesting and musically impressive, is perhaps Django Django’s chief strength.

Beam Me Up, with its industrial rhythm and New Order-inspired vocals, is a prime example of how rousing the band can be when they make the most of their inner musical magpie.

But, while the band’s sound hasn’t really changed, neither have the vocals - arguably the weakest element of each Django Django record thus far.

Technically, there’s nothing wrong with them: the harmonies are well pitched, popping up when they need to and falling silent when they should, and lead vocalist Vincent Neff’s delivery is competent. The problem remains that they’re bland. It’s like listening to the Beach Boys sans the sun and sweetness.

Case in point is the rather danceable Surface to Air, easily one of the record’s highlights (even with Star Wars blaster sound effects punctuating each and every chorus). It’s fronted by Slow Club’s Rebecca Taylor, the LP’s sole guest vocalist, and shows just how memorable Django’s songs can be when there’s a magnetic vocal moving the whole thing along.

‘Marble Skies’ is a frustrating record. There’s no question Django Django know their stuff, but there’s so much untapped potential hiding within. Almost 10 years into their career and three albums in, it’s hard to imagine the band will ever break beyond their own marble sky and into the stratosphere.

Django Django Upcoming Tour Dates are as follows:

Mon February 26 2018 - DUNDEE Fat Sams
Tue February 27 2018 - ABERDEEN Garage
Thu March 01 2018 - GLASGOW SWG3 TV Studio
Fri March 02 2018 - DUBLIN Tivoli Theatre
Sat March 03 2018 - LEEDS Church
Tue March 20 2018 - NOTTINGHAM Rescue Rooms
Wed March 21 2018 - MANCHESTER O2 Ritz
Fri March 23 2018 - LONDON Printworks
Sat March 24 2018 - BRISTOL SWX Bristol

Click here to compare & buy Django Django Tickets at Stereoboard.com.





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