Home > News & Reviews > Bat Fangs

Bat Fangs - Bat Fangs (Album Review)

Wednesday, 07 February 2018 Written by Huw Baines

Listening to Bat Fangs’ self-titled bow could feel like taking inventory. After all, its shelves are overflowing with rock staples: chunky riffs, driving drums and snotty hooks. But the duo - guitarist Betsy Wright, lately of Ex Hex, and Flesh Wounds drummer Laura King - consistently make them feel vital, alive and, perhaps most importantly, fun.

They know exactly how to make this rush of sugar and garage grit stick beyond a cursory listen, and the record’s first single, Wolfbite, sets out their stall remarkably well. A jolt of distortion twinned with several winning melodies, its clever structure and pointed delivery promises a feast for power-pop nerds that the album delivers.

The song’s energetic twists and turns, plus Wright’s sneering cool, are mirrored on the thunderous Bad Astrology and the enjoyably formulaic opener Turn It Up, which works almost entirely because of the verve with which it’s delivered. 

Star signs are a regular lyrical touchstone, as is the rabble of B-movie horror tropes that trail in the wake of the band's name. Elsewhere there are radios, boys of summer, ice cold laser beams, but they're all swept along by Wright's laconic drawl and some slick harmonies.

Wright’s solos, meanwhile, are melodic, crisp and sometimes venomous; her rhythm work refined to the point that it sounds freewheeling but is, in fact, tightly coiled. King plays with a sloppy gait that can’t camouflage the feeling she’d like to put a hole through her snare on every other beat. The whole record gets in and out in less than half an hour, and there’s barely a moment wasted between them.

Bat Fangs slot neatly into a growing group of rock bands keen to set aside the posturing unless the writing is there to back it up. The songs here - less knowingly kitsch than Sam Coffey and the Iron Lungs, a little more rugged than White Reaper - reward repeat visits because they’ve been properly built from the ground up. Wearing sunglasses on stage means nothing in isolation.





Let Us Know What You Think - Leave A Comment!




Related News

Bat Fangs Post New Track Boy Of Summer
Tue 30 Jan 2018
Bat Fangs have shared Boy of Summer, a track from their forthcoming debut LP.
Bat Fangs Announce Debut LP, Share New Single Wolfbite
Wed 01 Nov 2017
Bat Fangs have released a new single.
Still Pioneers After All These Years: Millencolin Return With 'SOS'
Wed 13 Feb 2019
Sometimes things just click. A band will figure out how they work at the right moment, release the right record on the right label at the right time, and find the right audience waiting. A little under two decades ago that happened to Millencolin when they sent ‘Pennybridge Pioneers’ into the world.
Mammoth Weed Wizard Bastard Among New Acts Announced For Cardiff Psych and Noise Fest
Thu 14 Feb 2019
Nine new acts have been announced for Cardiff Psych and Noise Fest.
Cass McCombs - Tip of the Sphere (Album Review)
Tue 12 Feb 2019
Nine albums deep, songwriter Cass McCombs has settled into the expansive world of ‘Tip of the Sphere’, a long-form blend of spoken word, minimalist psych-rock and ambient guitar moods.
'Being In A Band is a Dumb Idea': Pkew Pkew Pkew Keep Things Honest on 'Optimal Lifestyles'
Mon 25 Feb 2019
There is no other strain of self-analysis quite like the one that begins with a hangover placing its foot on your throat—that sweaty, heaving mass of bad decisions, good decisions that now feel like bad decisions, and inconvenient black spots.
There Can Never Be Too Many Guitar Solos: Du Blonde On Creative Control and 'Lung Bread For Daddy'
Thu 21 Feb 2019
“The ‘60s and ‘70s are where the majority of my music taste lies,” Du Blonde, aka Beth Jeans Houghton, says when asked about the vintage tones written all over her new record, ‘Lung Bread For Daddy’. “There can never be too many guitar solos. I’m surprised by how many people don’t love a good rock opera.”
 
< Prev   Next >